take your time

perfecting the "done before they arrive" party- a work in progress

Categories: Grains and Pasta, Sauces and Such, Dinner Party, Sources, Posted on March 24, 2013 by Sandy Bergsten - Comments (0)

In a world of texts and tweets we can fall victim to the illusion that anything is instantly available. Some things in life to take time to develop. Consider the evolution of a friendship or a simmering ragu. Time and genuine attention can alter what is seemingly simple into the truly sublime.

As fate would have it last Friday night we had the good fortune of having new friends who have become some of our all-time best over for dinner. And because old man winter has decided to hole up into spring I decided to make a batch of bolognese. Don’t be fooled with the modest ingredients. The hours of constant simmering and stirring transforms what earlier resembles a thin ground beef gruel into a silky and seductive blanket of welcoming warmth.

bolognese

Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a large deep skillet over medium-high heat. Add ground beef with a big pinch of kosher salt and a few grindings of fresh pepper.

bolognese

Cook, stirring often, until brown and cooked through, for about 4–5 minutes. Scrape into a bowl and set aside.

bolognese

Roughly chop the onion, carrots, and celery.

bolognese

Place in a food processor.

bolognese

Pulse until finely chopped.

bolognese

Wipe the skillet clean and add remaining 3 Tbsp. oil; heat over medium heat. Add the onion mixture and cook, stirring often over medium-low heat until softened, about 20 minutes.

bolognese

Stir in the browned meat. Add the milk and simmer, stirring frequently until the milk has bubbled away completely. Add a small grating of nutmeg.

bolognese

Add a cup of white wine and simmer until it has evaporated. Add the beef broth.

bolognese

Stir in the tomatoes and ½ teaspoon of sugar. 

bolognese

Simmer and simmer over low heat stirring occasionally, until the flavors meld and the sauce thickens for about three hours. Season the sauce to taste with salt, pepper.

Do Ahead- this sauce is best made a day or two ahead of time. Cool completely, cover and refrigerate. Once it is chilled transfer to an airtight container. Gently re-warm over a low heat, stirring frequently.

bolognese

Those from Bologna, Italy traditionally serve this sauce over tagliatelle. I like to throw in a Scandinavian twist and serve it on bucatini, a thin hollow tube pasta that at first glance resembles spaghetti but tastes nothing like it.

toast

There are moments in time to celebrate and last Friday was one to cherish.

post a comment

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

Submit the word you see below: